Welcome to stopthechoppers.ca
police helicopter crash

This twin-engine police helicopter experienced “tail rotor failure in the hover whilst observing the scene below” in the Whitchurch neighbourhood of Cardiff, South Wales, in April 2000. official report

 

New York Environmental Group Links Helicopter Noise to Health Problems
PUBLICATION: Daily News
DATE: January 12, 2000
SECTION: Suburban; Pg. 3
BYLINE: by Chrisena Coleman
According to the Daily News, the Natural Resources Defense Council released findings from a recent study saying that helicopter noise can lead to health problems.
In its 57-page report, the Natural Resources Defense Council said the type of noise caused by helicopters is linked to serious health problems in New Yorkers, including cardiovascular and sleep disorders, anxiety and impaired learning ability in children.
According to the study, titled "Needless Noise: The Negative Impacts of Helicopter Traffic in New York City and the Tri-State Region," there are not enough regulations in place to monitor helicopter noise, and it is putting the health of New Yorkers at risk.
"We found out that helicopters are very underregulated," said council spokeswoman Carolyn Cunningham, who wrote the report. "New York City has the highest helicopter traffic in the country, and the residents are severely impacted."
The report says there are no emission standards for helicopter engines and that their emissions go unabated and uncontrolled.
Council officials said the city should work toward decreasing the city's sightseeing helicopter flights and eventually ban them, because they are not necessary and are bad for the environment.
"New York City is the most heavily helicopter-trafficked area in the country, with more than 140,000 flights yearly during the 1990s," said Richard Kassel of the resources defense group. "Clearly, now is the time for the city and the individual heliports to decrease noise and protect the public."
The mayor's office today is expected to set up a helicopter task force to look into the matter. But the environmental group said the city's helicopter use master plan, released in the fall, understates the effects of increased numbers of helicopter overflights on the environment and public health. The group urged city officials to decrease the helicopter noise in an effort to protect the public.
Cunningham said the Council had done two studies about airport pollution in the area but did not look at helicopters. However, there were noise complaints on record from residents who did not like helicopters in their neighborhood, which prompted the latest study.
She said helicopters are not being forced to comply with noise and pollution regulations. The council said there is no provision in the Clean Air Act regulating pollution from aircraft.
"There is an urgent need for noise relief," said Cunningham. "Helicopter noise is annoying because of blade slap and low-frequency noise that results in building vibration."
She said residents also should be concerned about potentially harmful toxins released into the air by helicopters.
City Councilwoman Christine Quinn (D-Chelsea) said she has received all sorts of complaints from constituents about helicopter noise.
"Helicopter noise is an enormous problem in my district," said Quinn. "It is one of the chief complaints that I have heard since I took office. The noise is keeping their children up at night and causing their buildings to vibrate."
She said the industry has not been regulated but that she hopes the situation will be rectified.
"This report is enormously helpful to me," she said. "It further proves what people have been telling me all along."

 



Helicopter Noise Declared a Public Health Hazard in New York
PUBLICATION: Daily News
DATE: January 12, 2000
SECTION: Suburban; Pg. 3
BYLINE: by Chrisena Coleman
The New York Daily News reported on a study by the Natural Resources Defense Council concluding that helicopter noise is linked to serious health such as sleep and cardiovascular disorders, anxiety and impaired learning ability in children. The study focused on helicopter noise in New York.
According to the article the study, "Needless Noise: The Negative Impacts of Helicopter Traffic in New York City and the Tri-State Region" says more regulations are needed to monitor helicopter noise, emphasizing that the health of New Yorkers is at risk.
Carolyn Cunningham, author of the study was surprised at the paucity of regulations. "We found out that helicopters are very under regulated," she said. "New York City has the highest helicopter traffic in the country, and the residents are severely impacted."
The article said that New York has the highest number of helicopter flights in the country, logging more than 140,000 flights yearly during the 1990s, prompting council officials to call for fewer flights. The council added that the city's helicopter use master plan understates the effects of increased flights.
According to the article, the mayor's office will establish a helicopter task force.

The police helicopter seems designed as an in-your-face sign of intimidation.” John Sewell, Eye


A police helicopter in Nassau County,
New York demonstrating a low altitude pursuit.